St. Lucia

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St. Lucia

St. Lucia is more mountainous than most Caribbean islands, with the highest point being Mount Gimie, at 950 metres (3,120 feet) above sea level. Two other mountains, the Pitons, form the island’s most famous landmark. I want to see these. This is a World Heritage Site. 
It was founded by the French in 1650 but from 1803 to 1844, the British made the town a major naval port and built fortifications on Morne Fortune, the mountain that overlooks this important harbour. 
During World War II, a German U-boat sailed into Castries harbor and sank two allied ships in 1942, including the Canadian ocean liner RMS Lady Nelson, which was subsequently refloated in the harbour and taken to Canada to be converted to a hospital ship.
The write ups on this island makes me want to just hire a cab for a couple of places like Marigot Bay, a sheltered cove draped with palm trees and dotted with cocktail bars; it has been used in many movies. We should be able to walk to The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception is one of the most significant religious buildings built by the French in the Caribbean. Somewhat sober on the outside, it is full of colorful West Indian iconography and murals inside.
I also want to go to Sulphur Springs which is the “world’s only drive in volcano”. A hundred yards downstream from the springs, the water temperature is still hot (around 110 Fahrenheit or 45 Celsius), but cool enough for tourists to enter and give themselves a mud bath. These mud baths are believed by some to contain medical purposes and are used by some tourists and locals for said reasons.
st. lucia

st. lucia